Leukemia Articles A-Z

Leukemia Information - Oforta Discontinued

This page contains links to eMedTV Leukemia Articles containing information on subjects from Leukemia Information to Oforta Discontinued. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Leukemia Information
    Are you looking for information on leukemia? This eMedTV article is a good place to start. It presents a brief overview of this condition, covering possible symptoms and treatment options, with a link to more detailed information.
  • Leukemia Questions
    A person diagnosed with leukemia may not remember all the questions he or she has for the doctor. This eMedTV resource contains lists of leukemia questions people with the disease may consider asking their doctor.
  • Leukemia Radiation Therapy
    In cases of leukemia, radiation therapy (high-energy rays) may be used to treat the cancer. This eMedTV article discusses leukemia and radiation therapy, including information about side effects that may occur during the treatment.
  • Leukemia Research
    Current areas research on leukemia include studies examining new types of treatment. This eMedTV page outlines some of the research currently under way, including information on work being done on stem cell transplantation.
  • Leukemia Risk Factors
    There are certain factors that increase a person's chances of developing leukemia. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at some of these leukemia risk factors, such as exposure to very high levels of radiation and undergoing chemotherapy.
  • Leukemia Statistics
    Based on leukemia statistics, 35,070 people will be diagnosed with the disease in the United States in 2006. This eMedTV page contains various statistics on this disease, including survival rates, age-at-diagnosis figures, and lifetime risk percentages.
  • Leukemia Symptoms
    For people with leukemia, symptoms commonly include fevers, night sweats, frequent infections, and fatigue. This eMedTV article describes signs and symptoms of this disease, which may also include bruising easily, weight loss, and headaches.
  • Leukemia Treatment
    As this eMedTV page explains, treatment options for leukemia may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This article discusses these and other treatments, and includes information about side effects, second opinions, and clinical trials.
  • Leukemia Types
    This selection from the eMedTV archives lists the different leukemia types and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Leukeran
    Leukeran is a drug licensed to help relieve symptoms of lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV article contains more details on this medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, potential side effects, and more.
  • Leukeran and Arthritis
    People who have rheumatoid arthritis may receive Leukeran. However, as this eMedTV article explains, this is considered an "off-label" (unapproved) use for the medication. This page takes a brief look at how the drug works and links to more information.
  • Leukeran and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Leukeran (chlorambucil) passes through breast milk or would harm a nursing infant. This eMedTV page examines Leukeran use in breastfeeding women, with details on why the manufacturer advises women not to breastfeed while using this drug.
  • Leukeran and Pregnancy
    Is it safe for women to use Leukeran (chlorambucil) during pregnancy? This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this question, with an explanation of how this product performed in animal studies and why it is a pregnancy Category D drug.
  • Leukeran Chemotherapy Information
    Leukeran is a drug prescribed to treat lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at Leukeran, including how this chemotherapy drug is taken and who may not be able to use it. A link to more details is also included.
  • Leukeran Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, the dosing guidelines for using Leukeran typically call for 4 mg to 10 mg to be taken once daily. This article presents details on how to take this drug most effectively and when a person may need a lower dose.
  • Leukeran Drug Interactions
    A person may not be able to combine Leukeran with products like FluMist, echinacea, or Provenge. This eMedTV page features a detailed list of drugs that may cause interactions with Leukeran, as well as a description of the problems that may occur.
  • Leukeran for CLL
    A doctor may prescribe Leukeran to adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This eMedTV page takes a closer look at using Leukeran for CLL treatment, including how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Leukeran Off-Label Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Leukeran is a prescription drug that may sometimes be used to treat ovarian or testicular cancer; however, these are "off-label" (unapproved) uses. Other Leukeran uses are listed in this article, with links to more details.
  • Leukeran Overdose
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses, an overdose of Leukeran (chlorambucil) may cause problems such as anemia or a coma. This article lists other possible effects of an overdose and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Leukeran Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, possible Leukeran side effects include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This article also warns of the potentially serious reactions that can occur with this chemotherapy drug.
  • Leukeran Uses
    Leukeran is prescribed to help relieve symptoms caused by lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection presents details on when Leukeran is used, how it works, and whether it is safe for use in children or older adults.
  • Leukeran Warnings and Precautions
    You may have an increased risk for seizures or certain types of cancer while taking Leukeran. This eMedTV Web selection outlines important safety precautions to be aware of with Leukeran, including warnings of dangerous complications that may occur.
  • Leukima
    People who work with high radiation levels may be more likely than others to develop leukemia. This eMedTV segment lists other risk factors for this type of cancer and describes common symptoms. Leukima is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Leukimia
    Leukemia is a type of cancer that develops in blood-forming tissue. This part of the eMedTV library describes symptoms of leukemia and lists the various treatment options that are available. Leukimia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Leukoran
    A doctor may prescribe Leukeran to treat lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia in adults. This eMedTV article takes a look at this chemotherapy drug, including how it is taken and potential side effects. Leukoran is a common misspelling of Leukeran.
  • Leukran
    As this eMedTV resource explains, adults who have lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia may benefit from treatment with Leukeran. This page describes dosing instructions and potential side effects. Leukran is a common misspelling of Leukeran.
  • Leustatin
    Leustatin is a chemotherapy drug used to treat hairy cell leukemia. This article from the eMedTV Web library explores this medication in more detail, with information on how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Leustatin and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended that women not breastfeed while receiving Leustatin (cladribine). This eMedTV page discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and describes some of the problems that may occur if Leustatin is used while nursing.
  • Leustatin and Pregnancy
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, a fetus may be at risk for dangerous complications if the mother receives Leustatin (cladribine) during pregnancy. This page describes the problems that may occur and explains what your doctor may recommend.
  • Leustatin Chemotherapy Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Leustatin is a drug used to treat hairy cell leukemia in adults. This resource covers other information on this chemotherapy drug, describing how Leustatin is given, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • Leustatin Dosage
    Leustatin is given as a slow injection into a vein continuously for seven days. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at how your dosage of Leustatin is given, how the amount is determined, and how long treatment will last.
  • Leustatin Drug Interactions
    When Leustatin is used with roflumilast, echinacea, or certain other drugs, it may cause interactions. This eMedTV article describes how these and other products may cause side effects or interfere with the effectiveness of the medications.
  • Leustatin Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV archives explains that an overdose on Leustatin (cladribine) may cause dangerous reactions. This resource discusses the specific effects of this type of overdose and describes how these problems may be treated.
  • Leustatin Side Effects
    Low blood cell counts, nausea, and a skin rash are among the possible side effects of Leustatin. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed list of reactions to this chemotherapy medication. It also explains when to seek urgent medical treatment.
  • Leustatin Uses
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, Leustatin is used for treating hairy cell leukemia in adults. This page describes how Leustatin works to slow down the progression of this disease and lists some unapproved reasons to use this chemotherapy drug.
  • Leustatin Warnings and Precautions
    Nerve damage and life-threatening infections are some of the complications that may occur with Leustatin. This eMedTV segment outlines other warnings and precautions for Leustatin, and offers details on who should not use the chemotherapy drug.
  • Living With Leukemia
    Support groups, social workers, and counselors can provide support to people living with leukemia. This eMedTV segment suggests sources of support that may help people with leukemia cope with the practical and emotional aspects of the disease.
  • Lokomia
    Leukemia is a cancer that occurs when the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. This eMedTV page describes the action of these blood cells and explains how many people are affected by the disease. Lokomia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Luekemia
    Leukemia is a cancer that develops in the bone marrow or other blood-forming tissue. This eMedTV segment lists common symptoms of leukemia and explains how this disease progresses. Luekemia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Luekimia
    Leukemia is a type of cancer that forms in the bone marrow. This eMedTV article describes the effects of this disease, explains how many people are affected by it, and lists symptoms that may occur. Luekimia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Lukemia
    Leukemia is a cancer that often develops in the bone marrow. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes how leukemia progresses and explains what treatment options are available for this type of cancer. Lukemia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Marqibo
    A chemotherapy drug, Marqibo is approved to treat a certain type of leukemia. This Web page takes a closer look at this prescription drug, with information on specific uses, dosing tips, how it works, and potential side effects.
  • Marqibo and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV resource discusses the potential problems that may occur in a nursing infant whose mother is using Marqibo while breastfeeding. This page explains whether this drug passes through breast milk and covers the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Marqibo and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Marqibo (liposomal vincristine) may be harmful if taken during pregnancy. This resource lists the problems that occurred when Marqibo was given to pregnant animals, and explains the general recommendation for pregnant women.
  • Marqibo Chemotherapy Information
    Marqibo is a prescription drug used to treat a certain type of acute leukemia in adults. This eMedTV Web selection features more information on Marqibo, including how this chemotherapy drug is administered, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Marqibo Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, your dose of Marqibo will be determined based on a number of factors, such as how you respond to the drug and your height and weight. More specific dosing instructions are provided in this article.
  • Marqibo Drug Interactions
    Echinacea, live vaccinations, and various other drugs can cause interactions with Marqibo. This eMedTV article takes a look at how these reactions with Marqibo may lead to dangerous complications. It also explores some of the ways to avoid these problems.
  • Marqibo Overdose
    This eMedTV segment examines the potential effects of an overdose on Marqibo (liposomal vincristine). This article describes some of the problems that might result and explains what a healthcare provider may do to treat these complications.
  • Marqibo Side Effects
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Marqibo often causes side effects, such as fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea. This resource examines other reactions to this chemotherapy drug and explains which problems require medical treatment right away.
  • Marqibo Uses
    Marqibo is prescribed to treat a certain type of leukemia in adults. This part of the eMedTV Web library contains details on what Marqibo is used for, how it works to slow down the progression of the cancer, and whether it's safe for children.
  • Marqibo Warnings and Precautions
    People who use Marqibo may experience liver problems, severe constipation, or drug interactions. This eMedTV Web page explores other important safety precautions with Marqibo, including warnings for those who should avoid using this chemotherapy drug.
  • Marquibo
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Marqibo to treat a certain type of acute leukemia in adults. This eMedTV page examines this prescription drug in more detail, including possible side effects. Marquibo is a common misspelling of Marqibo.
  • Mitoxantron
    Mitoxantrone is a medication prescribed to treat multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer. This eMedTV page describes specific uses of this drug and explains what to discuss with your doctor. Mitoxantron is a common misspelling of mitoxantrone.
  • Mitoxantrone
    Mitoxantrone can help treat certain types of cancer or multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV Web page presents an overview of this prescription medication, including specific uses, how it works, side effects, and links to more detailed information.
  • Mitoxantrone Dosage
    This eMedTV selection contains dosing guidelines for mitoxantrone, including how often it is given and other important instructions for using this medicine effectively. It also covers some of the tests your doctor will order to ensure a safe treatment.
  • Mitoxantrone Drug Information
    Mitoxantrone is licensed for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web selection contains basic information on mitoxantrone, including how this drug works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Mitoxantrone Side Effects
    Mitoxantrone may cause serious infections, heart problems, or other complications in some people. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at other possible side effects of mitoxantrone and explains which problems require urgent medical care.
  • Mitroxantrone
    Available by prescription only, mitoxantrone is used for multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and possible side effects. Mitroxantrone is a common misspelling of mitoxantrone.
  • Multiple Sclerosis and Mitoxantrone
    By damaging DNA, mitoxantrone can help treat multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer. This eMedTV article takes a closer look this medicine, with details on how mitoxantrone works and approved uses for the drug. It also links to more details.
  • Mustargen
    As a chemotherapy drug, Mustargen is prescribed to treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web selection features more details on this medicine, with information on how it is given, possible side effects, and approved uses.
  • Mustargen 10 Mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Mustargen comes in one form and strength -- 10 mg dry powder vials. This page explains how this chemotherapy drug is given and how your specific dose is calculated. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Mustargen and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether Mustargen (mechlorethamine) passes through breast milk or would harm a nursing infant. This eMedTV article contains some safety questions involving Mustargen use in breastfeeding women and explains what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Mustargen and Pregnancy
    Using Mustargen (mechlorethamine) during pregnancy may expose your fetus to serious risks. This eMedTV article explores the complications this drug could cause during pregnancy, and explains why an effective birth control method is recommended.
  • Mustargen Dosage
    As covered in this eMedTV segment, the recommended Mustargen dosing regimen will vary for each person, depending on his or her weight, the type of cancer being treated, and various other factors. This article explores dosing instructions in more detail.
  • Mustargen Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment contains information on Mustargen, a drug prescribed to help minimize symptoms caused by certain types of cancer. This page gives an overview of side effects and general safety precautions. It also provides a link to more details.
  • Mustargen Drug Interactions
    Provenge, FluMist, and echinacea are some of the products that may interact with Mustargen. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that can interfere with this chemotherapy drug and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Mustargen Overdose
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, using too much Mustargen (mechlorethamine) may cause problems such as vomiting and even death. This article lists other possible effects and explains why an overdose on Mustargen is unlikely to occur.
  • Mustargen Side Effects
    As outlined in this part of the eMedTV Web library, possible Mustargen side effects include diarrhea, hair loss, and vomiting. This article also provides details on which reactions are significant and require your doctor's immediate attention.
  • Mustargen Used to Treat Pleural Effusion
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Mustargen is used to treat pleural effusion associated with metastatic cancer. This article explores this and other possible uses for this chemotherapy drug, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Mustargen Uses
    Mustargen is a form of chemotherapy used in the treatment of a number of different cancers. This eMedTV resource gives an in-depth look at the specific cancers Mustargen is used to treat and how the drug works. A list of off-label uses is also included.
  • Mustargen Warnings and Precautions
    Infections and dangerous injection site reactions are some of the possible complications with Mustargen. This eMedTV resource discusses other important warnings for using Mustargen safely, including precautions for women who are pregnant or nursing.
  • Nipen
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Nipent is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat hairy cell leukemia. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Nipen is a common misspelling of Nipent.
  • Nipent
    Given as an intravenous injection, Nipent is prescribed to treat a cancer called hairy cell leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection contains more information on this chemotherapy drug, including details on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Nipent and Breastfeeding
    Women who want to breastfeed during treatment with Nipent (pentostatin) should talk to their doctor. This eMedTV page explains why it is usually not recommended to use this drug while nursing. A list of potentially serious complications is also provided.
  • Nipent and Pregnancy
    An unborn child may suffer potential harm if the mother receives Nipent (pentostatin) during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web selection describes potential problems that may occur and explains why an effective form of birth control is typically recommended.
  • Nipent Chemotherapy Information
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, Nipent is given to treat hairy cell leukemia. More information is covered in this eMedTV segment, including details on how this medication is administered, how your dosage is calculated, possible side effects, and more.
  • Nipent Dosage
    Nipent is given as an injection into a vein once every other week. This part of the eMedTV Web library discusses how your Nipent dosage is calculated, how long treatment will last, and what to expect when receiving this chemotherapy drug.
  • Nipent Drug Interactions
    Combining live vaccinations, echinacea, or certain other drugs with Nipent can lead to serious interactions. This eMedTV Web page examines how these and other products may cause side effects or interfere with the effectiveness of the medications.
  • Nipent Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV article, an overdose on Nipent (pentostatin) may cause dangerous complications. This resource lists some of these problems, explains how they are treated, and discusses why an intentional overdose is unlikely.
  • Nipent Side Effects
    Seek medical treatment if you develop confusion, fever, or other potentially serious problems with Nipent. This eMedTV segment contains more details on other possible side effects of Nipent, including common and potentially serious reactions.
  • Nipent Uses
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, Nipent is used for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia in adults. This page takes a closer look at this and other possible uses for the chemotherapy drug. A detailed explanation of how the drug works is also included.
  • Nipent Warnings and Precautions
    Potentially life-threatening infections and other side effects may occur in some people receiving Nipent. This eMedTV article highlights other important safety warnings for this chemotherapy drug, including precautions for those taking certain medicines.
  • Oforta
    As discussed in this eMedTV page, Fludara is a medication prescribed to treat a type of leukemia. This article explains how this drug is given and discusses how the active ingredient in Fludara was previously sold in tablet form as a drug called Oforta.
  • Oforta Discontinued
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, Fludara is prescribed to treat B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection describes how this drug is given and explains why the tablet form (sold under the name Oforta) has been discontinued.
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