Leukemia Articles A-Z

Generic Cytoxan - Leukemia Diagnosis

This page contains links to eMedTV Leukemia Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Cytoxan to Leukemia Diagnosis. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Cytoxan
    Cytoxan is available in generic form. As this eMedTV page explains, generic Cytoxan tablets come in two strengths and the injectable form comes in various vial sizes. Roxane Laboratories and Baxter Healthcare Corp. manufacture generic Cytoxan.
  • Generic Elitek
    There are no generic Elitek (rasburicase) products currently available. This eMedTV page explains why this is the case and discusses when a generic version of this drug might become available. It also explains why Elitek is considered a biologic product.
  • Generic Fludara
    There are generic Fludara (fludarabine) products currently available. This eMedTV resource presents more information on these generic medications, including available strengths, a list of manufacturers, and whether the generics are as good as Fludara.
  • Generic Gleevec
    There is currently no generic Gleevec (sunitinib) available. This eMedTV segment discusses when this situation might change and explains why sunitinib is considered the "generic name" and not a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic Iclusig
    There are no generic Iclusig (ponatinib) products available at this time. However, as this eMedTV page explains, a generic version may become available after the drug's first patent expires in 2026. It also describes instances that may delay this date.
  • Generic Leukeran
    There are currently no generic Leukeran (chlorambucil) products available. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at whether a generic version might become available. It also defines the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Leustatin
    There are generic Leustatin (cladribine) products currently available. This part of the eMedTV library lists the available strength of these generics, explains who makes them, and discusses whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Marqibo
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Marqibo (liposomal vincristine) is not available as a generic medication at this time. This resource explains why a generic Marqibo product is unavailable and discusses when a generic version might be made.
  • Generic Mustargen
    No generic Mustargen (mechlorethamine) products are available at this time. This eMedTV Web selection discusses why companies have not chosen to make a generic version of this drug and whether a generic might be available in the future.
  • Generic Nipent
    All of the patents for Nipent (pentostatin) have expired and this drug is available as a generic product. This eMedTV segment explains who makes generic Nipent and discusses whether this generic product is as good as the brand-name medicine.
  • Generic Purinethol
    There are generic Purinethol (mercaptopurine) products currently available. This eMedTV resource presents more information on these generics, including available strengths, a list of manufacturers, and whether the generics are as good as Purinethol.
  • Generic Rituxan
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Rituxan (rituximab). This eMedTV Web page offers an explanation as to why this medication is not available in this form and discusses the possibility of generic versions becoming available in the future.
  • Generic Sprycel
    There are no generic Sprycel (dasatinib) products available at this time. This eMedTV segment discusses when a generic version of the medicine might be introduced and explains how dasatinib is the generic name and not a generic version of Sprycel.
  • Generic Synribo
    Companies are not allowed to make a generic Synribo (omacetaxine) product at this time. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, however, a generic version of the drug may become available after the patent expires in 2019.
  • Generic Tabloid
    There are no generic Tabloid (thioguanine) tablets available at this time, as explained in this eMedTV resource. This article discusses why this is the case and explores the possibility of whether a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Tasigna
    As explained in this eMedTV article, there are no generic Tasigna (nilotinib) products available at this time, as the drug is protected by patents and exclusivity rights. This page also discusses when a generic version might become available.
  • Generic Treanda
    No generic Treanda (bendamustine) products are available at this time. This eMedTV selection discusses when this situation might change. It also explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Gleevec
    This eMedTV segment takes a detailed look at Gleevec, a chemotherapy drug used to treat leukemia, a rare skin cancer, and a type of tumor affecting the GI tract. This article offers information on how this drug works, side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Gleevec and Bleeding
    Certain problems are possible when taking Gleevec; bleeding is just one of them. This page of the eMedTV library discusses the risk of bleeding with this drug, how your healthcare provider will check for it, and what happens if it occurs.
  • Gleevec and Breastfeeding
    It is generally not recommended for women to breastfeed during treatment with Gleevec (sunitinib). This eMedTV segment discusses whether the drug passes through human breast milk and describes some of the possible problems that may occur.
  • Gleevec and Children
    This eMedTV Web page explains that children as young as two years old can take Gleevec, although the long-term effects of the drug are unknown. This page also explains how this drug works and when it is used, with a link to more information.
  • Gleevec and GIST
    One of the conditions Gleevec can treat is GIST. This eMedTV segment briefly discusses what this condition is and when Gleevec is used to treat it. A link to more information on this drug's indications is also included.
  • Gleevec and Other Uses
    This eMedTV page explains that two kinds of leukemia can be treated with Gleevec; other uses include cancer affecting the gastrointestinal tract and skin. This page lists many of the conditions this medicine is used for, with a link to more information.
  • Gleevec and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV article explains, Gleevec (sunitinib) may cause problems if it is taken during pregnancy. This article describes what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals and discusses when a doctor will prescribe it during pregnancy.
  • Gleevec and Prostate Cancer
    Unfortunately, prostate cancer cannot be treated with Gleevec. This page from the eMedTV archives takes a closer look at this topic and includes a link to detailed information on the conditions Gleevec is approved to treat.
  • Gleevec and Tylenol
    This eMedTV article explains why taking Tylenol and Gleevec together may not be a good idea and why you should discuss this drug combination with your healthcare provider. A link to more information on drug interactions is also included.
  • Gleevec Dosage
    This eMedTV selection reminds readers that Gleevec tablets should be swallowed whole and should never be chewed or opened. This article explores the factors that may affect your Gleevec dosage and offers helpful tips on taking this drug.
  • Gleevec Drug Interactions
    A number of drugs are known to interact with Gleevec, including topotecan, pimecrolimus, and budesonide. This eMedTV Web page offers more details on these and other interactions, with details on the potentially dangerous complications that may occur.
  • Gleevec for Thyroid Cancer
    Based on clinical studies, thyroid cancer might be treatable with Gleevec; however, more research is needed. This eMedTV segment discusses this topic in more detail, listing the types of cancer this drug is known to be effective for.
  • Gleevec Medication Information
    This page of the eMedTV site provides some basic information on Gleevec, which is used to treat certain types of cancer. This segment includes some important safety precautions and warnings, and lists some of the possible side effects.
  • Gleevec Overdose
    This selection from the eMedTV site explains that if you use too much Gleevec (sunitinib), it can cause problems like nausea and vomiting. This resource describes other possible overdose symptoms and discusses how your doctor may treat these reactions.
  • Gleevec Side Affects
    No drug is without side effects, and Gleevec is no exception. This eMedTV resource lists some of the adverse reactions that might occur during treatment with this medicine. Gleevec side affects is a common misspelling of Gleevec side effects.
  • Gleevec Side Effects
    Clinical studies have shown that common Gleevec side effects include diarrhea, fatigue, and edema. This eMedTV article provides a list of other possible reactions to this drug, including potentially serious problems that need prompt medical care.
  • Gleevec Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, Gleevec is prescribed for certain types of cancer. This article offers more information on what Gleevec is used for, including the specific types of cancer it can treat and whether it can be used in children.
  • Gleevec Warnings and Precautions
    Gleevec can increase your risk for certain problems, such as heart attacks and life-threatening bleeding. This eMedTV Web selection offers more warnings and precautions for Gleevec, including details on why this medicine may not be safe for some people.
  • Gleevek
    Healthcare providers may prescribe Gleevec as part of a person's cancer treatment. This eMedTV segment lists the types of cancer this drug can treat and explains how it works, with a link to more information. Gleevek is a common misspelling of Gleevec.
  • Gleevic
    Specific types of cancer are treated with Gleevec, which this eMedTV selection lists. This segment also explains briefly how this drug works, possible side effects, and when and how to take it. Gleevic is a common misspelling of Gleevec.
  • Gleevick
    Gleevec is a type of chemotherapy that is taken by mouth once or twice a day. This eMedTV article describes some of the complications you should be aware of when taking this drug. Gleevick is a common misspelling of Gleevec.
  • Glevec
    As this eMedTV page explains, Gleevec is a type of chemotherapy that is taken once or twice daily. This page provides a brief overview of when and how to take this product, with a link to more information. Glevec is a common misspelling of Gleevec.
  • Hairy Cell Leukemia
    Hairy cell leukemia occurs when cancer cells develop in the blood and bone marrow. This section of the eMedTV library provides an overview of this condition, including information about its symptoms, tests used to detect the disease, and treatment.
  • Hairy Cell Leukemia Cancer
    This eMedTV Web page gives a brief overview of hairy cell leukemia, a form of cancer that most typically affects older males. This article tells you what you need to know about symptoms, how the disease got its name, and more.
  • Hairy Cell Leukemia Stages
    There are no hairy cell leukemia stages. As explained in this eMedTV segment, cases of hairy cell leukemia are classified as being untreated, progressive, relapsed, or refractory. This article defines these classifications for hairy cell leukemia.
  • Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment
    This eMedTV Web page describes treatment options for hairy cell leukemia, including watchful waiting, biological therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. This article discusses each of these treatment options in detail.
  • Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment by Stage
    There is no hairy cell leukemia treatment by stage per se; however, this eMedTV article does break down treatment for the cancer based on whether the case of hairy cell leukemia is considered untreated, progressive, relapsed, or refractory.
  • Iclusig
    Iclusig is a chemotherapy drug approved to treat certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV segment contains more details on this prescription drug, with information on dosing instructions, an explanation of how it works, and a list of potential side effects.
  • Iclusig and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, women are generally advised to not breastfeed while taking Iclusig (ponatinib), as potentially serious reactions might occur in a nursing infant. This article describes the potential problems that could occur.
  • Iclusig and Pregnancy
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, an unborn child may be harmed if a woman takes Iclusig (ponatinib) during pregnancy. This article explores this topic, including the results of animal studies on this chemotherapy medication.
  • Iclusig Chemotherapy Information
    Prior to starting chemotherapy with Iclusig, your doctor will need information on your medical history. This eMedTV Web page covers other important details to discuss with your doctor. It also explains how the drug is taken and possible side effects.
  • Iclusig Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, your Iclusig dosage will be determined based on a number of factors, such as how you respond to the drug and other medical conditions you may have. More specific dosing guidelines are provided in this article.
  • Iclusig Drug Interactions
    Antacids, certain supplements, and various other products can react with Iclusig. This eMedTV resource examines how drug interactions with Iclusig may lead to dangerous complications. It also explores some of the ways to avoid these problems.
  • Iclusig Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers a discussion on whether an overdose on Iclusig (ponatinib) would cause dangerous problems. This resource lists possible effects of an overdose and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Iclusig Side Effects
    As this eMedTV segment explains, serious Iclusig side effects include chest pain, vision changes, and bloody stools. This article offers a more in-depth list of reactions to this chemotherapy drug and explains which problems require immediate treatment.
  • Iclusig Uses
    Iclusig is prescribed to slow down the progression of a certain type of leukemia in adults. This eMedTV resource presents details on what Iclusig is used for, how it works to prevent the formation of abnormal cells, and whether it's safe for older adults.
  • Iclusig Warnings and Precautions
    Iclusig may cause problems with your pancreas, liver, or blood cell counts. This part of the eMedTV Web library explores safety precautions to be aware of with Iclusig, including warnings for those who should avoid taking this chemotherapy drug.
  • IV Busulfex
    Given as an intravenous injection (by IV), Busulfex is used to prepare the body for a stem cell transplant. This eMedTV page explains when this drug is prescribed, how it is given, and possible side effects. It also links to more details.
  • Leaukemia
    Leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells that starts in the bone marrow. This eMedTV Web page describes the action of abnormal blood cells in people with leukemia and lists symptoms of the disease. Leaukemia is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Lekima
    Leukemia, a type of cancer, usually starts in the bone marrow. This portion of the eMedTV Web site describes some of the symptoms of this cancer and explains who is at a higher risk for developing it. Lekima is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Leukemi
    Leukemia is a form of cancer that affects blood-forming tissue, such as bone marrow. This article from the eMedTV archives lists risk factors for leukemia and describes symptoms of the condition. Leukemi is a common misspelling of leukemia.
  • Leukemia
    Leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow in which the body produces abnormal white blood cells. This eMedTV article offers an overview of leukemia, including information about types of the disease, its symptoms, and its treatment.
  • Leukemia and 2-Deoxycoformycin
    Nipent, also called 2-deoxycoformycin, is prescribed to treat hairy cell leukemia. This eMedTV page explains how this chemotherapy drug works to slow down the progression of this disease, how it is given, and side effects. It also links to more details.
  • Leukemia and Busulfan
    As described in this part of the eMedTV Web library, busulfan is licensed to treat a certain type of leukemia. This resource explains how this drug works and gives some general dosing information. It also links to more details on this specific topic.
  • Leukemia and Busulphan
    Adults and children with chronic myelogenous leukemia may benefit from busulfan. This eMedTV page describes this prescription drug in more detail and lists some dosing information. Leukemia and busulphan is a common misspelling of leukemia and busulfan.
  • Leukemia and Fludara
    As this eMedTV article explains, chronic lymphocytic leukemia may be treated with Fludara, a chemotherapy drug used after other treatment has failed. This article provides more information on what it is approved for, details on how it works, and more.
  • Leukemia and Mitoxantrone
    Adults who have certain types of leukemia may receive mitoxantrone. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes specific uses for this prescription drug, along with some unapproved uses as well. This page also offers a link to more details.
  • Leukemia and Treanda
    A doctor may prescribe Treanda to adults who have a certain type of leukemia called CLL. This eMedTV Web page examines this and other possible uses of Treanda, with details on how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Leukemia and Vincristine
    As this eMedTV article explains, doctors may prescribe vincristine to treat acute leukemia. This resource covers more information on what this drug is approved for and how it works. It also offers a link to more details on this topic.
  • Leukemia Cells
    Leukemia cells are abnormal cells produced by blood-forming tissue. As this segment of the eMedTV Web site explains, there are two main types of these cells and they cause different symptoms and types of leukemia.
  • Leukemia Chemotherapy Treatment
    In cases of leukemia, chemotherapy treatment uses anticancer drugs to kill leukemia cells. This eMedTV article explains how chemotherapy may be administered to people with this condition and describes the side effects associated with this treatment.
  • Leukemia Diagnosis
    As explained on this eMedTV Web page, diagnosing leukemia will usually involve a physical exam and certain tests and procedures. This article offers more details on blood tests, biopsies, chest x-rays, and other methods of diagnosing this illness.
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