Leukemia Articles A-Z

Spycel - What Is Vincristine Used For?

This page contains links to eMedTV Leukemia Articles containing information on subjects from Spycel to What Is Vincristine Used For?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Spycel
    Sprycel is a drug used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This eMedTV article covers some dosing information, lists side effects, and describes some basic safety precautions. Spycel is a common misspelling of Sprycel.
  • Spycell
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have certain types of leukemia may benefit from the chemotherapy drug Sprycel. This page describes some dosing guidelines and potential side effects. Spycell is a common misspelling of Sprycel.
  • Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
    Instead of stages for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the disease is identified based on classifications. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the classifications or stages of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Stages of CLL
    Stages of CLL include stages 0-IV and refractory (cancer that does not get better with treatment). This eMedTV article defines each of these stages of CLL and covers some of the tests used in the staging process, including x-rays, MRIs, and CT scans.
  • Stages of Leukemia
    As this eMedTV page explains, stages of leukemia are not used to express the extent of most types of the disease. This article explains how cases of the more common types of leukemia are classified.
  • Stem Cell Transplantation and Leukemia
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, stem cell transplantation may allow some leukemia patients to be treated with high doses of drugs, radiation, or both. This article discusses stem cell transplantation and leukemia treatment.
  • Symptoms of ALL
    As this eMedTV page explains, possible ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukemia) symptoms include easy bleeding, loss of appetite, and tiny red spots under the skin. This article provides a list of possible signs of this condition in adults and children.
  • Symptoms of Chronic Leukemia
    Symptoms of chronic leukemia may include fever, feeling very tired, and weight loss. This part of the eMedTV library discusses symptoms of chronic leukemia seen with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
  • Synribo
    Synribo is prescribed to treat a type of blood and bone marrow cancer called chronic myeloid leukemia. This eMedTV Web page outlines more details on this prescription medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Synribo and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether Synribo (omacetaxine) passes through breast milk or if it would harm a nursing infant. This eMedTV Web selection examines why it is generally recommended that women not use Synribo while breastfeeding and the problems it could cause.
  • Synribo and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page contains a discussion on the safety issues surrounding the use of Synribo (omacetaxine) during pregnancy. It takes a look at the serious complications that may occur and explains why women should use birth control during treatment.
  • Synribo Chemotherapy Information
    By preventing abnormal cancer cells from forming, Synribo can treat chronic myeloid leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection contains information on Synribo, including how this chemotherapy drug works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Synribo Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, your height, weight, and various other factors are used to determine your dosage of Synribo. This drug is given as an injection twice daily for 7 to 14 days in a row. More dosing tips are outlined in this article.
  • Synribo Drug Interactions
    Serious interactions may occur if you combine Synribo with certain drugs or other products. This eMedTV Web page explains how some prescription and nonprescription medicines, and even herbal supplements, can cause serious problems with Synribo.
  • Synribo Overdose
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, an overdose on Synribo (omacetaxine) may cause vomiting, a rash, or other complications. This page describes other possible effects of an overdose and lists some of the ways these problems may be treated.
  • Synribo Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, possible Synribo side effects include diarrhea, fatigue, and anemia. This page also describes warnings of potentially serious problems that can occur with this chemotherapy drug and explains when treatment is needed.
  • Synribo Uses
    Synribo is prescribed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in adults. This eMedTV page discusses why Synribo is only used after certain other chemotherapy treatments have been tried. It also offers an explanation on how this drug works.
  • Synribo Warnings and Precautions
    Allergic reactions, seriously low blood cell counts, and other problems are associated with using Synribo. This eMedTV resource presents a list of safety precautions to be aware of with Synribo, including warnings for people who should not use this drug.
  • Tabloid
    Tabloid is a chemotherapy drug licensed for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. This eMedTV Web page contains more details on this prescription drug, with information on how it works, how it is taken, and side effects that may occur.
  • Tabloid and Breastfeeding
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, women are generally advised to not breastfeed while taking Tabloid (thioguanine), due to potentially serious reactions that might occur in a nursing infant. This page examines the problems that could occur.
  • Tabloid and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, Tabloid (thioguanine) is generally not recommended for pregnant women. This page explores this topic in more detail and stresses the importance of using an effective form of birth control during treatment.
  • Tabloid Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, your Tabloid dosage is calculated using your height and weight, as well as other factors. This article presents details on how this chemotherapy drug is taken and offers some tips on how best to take it.
  • Tabloid Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to take certain supplements, vaccines, or other products with Tabloid. This eMedTV page examines how drug interactions with Tabloid can cause potentially serious complications. It also discusses how to avoid these problems.
  • Tabloid Medication Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Tabloid is a type of chemotherapy drug. This article gives a brief overview of Tabloid, with information on how to take it, the specific type of cancer the medication is approved to treat, and more.
  • Tabloid Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV Web library discusses how an overdose on Tabloid (thioguanine) may cause potentially dangerous problems. This article outlines possible effects of an overdose and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Tabloid Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, possible Tabloid side effects include nausea, vomiting, and mouth sores. This article provides a more in-depth list of reactions to this chemotherapy drug, including those that require immediate treatment.
  • Tabloid Uses
    Tabloid is approved to treat acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in adults and children. This eMedTV page presents more details on what Tabloid is used for, with information on how it works, whether it's safe for older adults, and more.
  • Tabloid Warnings and Precautions
    Some people may have a higher risk for complications like infections or anemia while using Tabloid. This eMedTV Web selection explores safety precautions to be aware of with Tabloid, including warnings of serious complications that may occur.
  • Tasigna
    Tasigna is a drug licensed to treat a type of cancer called chronic myeloid leukemia. This eMedTV page describes the effects of this medication, explains what to know before taking the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Tasigna 150 Mg
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at when a doctor may prescribe Tasigna 150-mg capsules. This article lists the other available strength of Tasigna and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. A link to more details is also included.
  • Tasigna and Breastfeeding
    In general, women are advised not to breastfeed while taking Tasigna (nilotinib). This eMedTV segment takes a look at whether this drug passes through breast milk and describes some of the problems that may occur if Tasigna is taken while breastfeeding.
  • Tasigna and Pregnancy
    Taking Tasigna (nilotinib) during pregnancy could be harmful to the unborn child. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on what could happen if a pregnant woman uses this drug and discusses what your doctor may recommend.
  • Tasigna and Tyrosine Kinase
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Tasigna is a type of tyrosine kinase inhibitor that works to slow the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia. This page takes a closer look at how this chemotherapy drug works and offers a link to more details.
  • Tasigna Chemotherapy
    If you have chromic myeloid leukemia (CML), Tasigna can help slow down the progression of the cancer. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of Tasigna, with details on how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Tasigna Dosage
    Tasigna comes as a capsule that is taken twice daily on an empty stomach. This eMedTV segment discusses the factors your doctor will consider when determining your specific dose of Tasigna. A list of helpful tips on how to take this drug is also included.
  • Tasigna Drug Interactions
    Products that may interact with Tasigna include Tums, Zoloft, and echinacea, among others. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Tasigna reactions can increase your risk for potentially serious complications, such as infections.
  • Tasigna Medication Information
    Tasigna is a medicine prescribed to slow down the progression of chronic myeloid leukemia. This eMedTV page offers some basic information on Tasigna, including how this medication works, dosing tips, and warnings. A link to more details is also included.
  • Tasigna Overdose
    This eMedTV article explains that an overdose on Tasigna (nilotinib) may cause several problems, such as vomiting and infections. This page further discusses the specific effects of this type of overdose and describes how these problems may be treated.
  • Tasigna Side Effects
    Diarrhea, coughing, and night sweats are among the common side effects of Tasigna. This eMedTV segment lists some of the drug's most common side effects, as well as potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical treatment.
  • Tasigna Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, Tasigna is used for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in adults. This article describes how this chemotherapy drug works and discusses whether there are any off-label (unapproved) reasons to use the drug.
  • Tasigna Warnings and Precautions
    Taking Tasigna can increase your risk of a life-threatening irregular heart rhythm called QT prolongation. This eMedTV resource contains other warnings and precautions for Tasigna, and offers details on who should not take the chemotherapy drug.
  • Therapy With Leukeran
    Healthcare providers may recommend Leukeran as a type of chemotherapy for certain blood cell cancers. This eMedTV Web selection contains details on specific uses for this drug and describes why Leukeran may not be safe for some people.
  • Tosigna
    Tasigna is a drug that treats chronic myeloid leukemia by slowing down the progression of the disease. This eMedTV page gives a brief description of this medication, including dosing guidelines and side effects. Tosigna is a common misspelling of Tasigna.
  • Traenda
    As this page of the eMedTV Web site explains, people who have non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia may benefit from Treanda. This page describes specific uses and lists potential side effects. Traenda is a common misspelling of Treanda.
  • Treand
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, adults who have lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia may receive treatment with Treanda. This page describes dosing guidelines and potential safety issues. Treand is a common misspelling of Treanda.
  • Treanda
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, Treanda is prescribed to treat certain types of leukemia and lymphoma. This eMedTV Web page features more details on this medicine, with information on how it is given, possible side effects, and whether it is effective.
  • Treanda and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear whether Treanda (bendamustine) passes through breast milk or would harm a nursing infant. This eMedTV segment explores some safety questions involving Treanda use in breastfeeding woman and explains what the manufacturer advises.
  • Treanda and Pregnancy
    Using Treanda (bendamustine) may pose significant risks to a woman who might be pregnant. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at some of the complications that Treanda could cause during pregnancy, such as miscarriages and birth defects.
  • Treanda Chemotherapy
    Healthcare providers may recommend Treanda as a type of chemotherapy for certain blood cell cancers. This eMedTV resource provides more details on specific uses, possible side effects, and how the injection is given. It also links to more information.
  • Treanda Dosage
    As covered in this eMedTV article, the dosing guidelines for Treanda will depend on your height, weight, and various other factors. This page takes a closer look at how the amount is determined, as well as details on when and how it is administered.
  • Treanda Drug Interactions
    Do not use certain drugs while undergoing treatment with Treanda without first talking to your doctor. This eMedTV segment examines some of the complications that may occur with Treanda drug interactions, and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Treanda Medication Information
    Treanda is a drug prescribed to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV page gives more information on Treanda, including how this medication is given and who may not be able to use it. It also links to more details.
  • Treanda Overdose
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, using too much Treanda (bendamustine) may cause problems such as anemia or seizures. This article lists other possible effects and explains why an overdose on Treanda is unlikely to occur.
  • Treanda Side Effects
    As outlined in this eMedTV resource, common Treanda side effects include low levels of various blood cells, vomiting, and reduced appetite. This page also covers details on which reactions are significant and require your doctor's immediate attention.
  • Treanda Uses
    Treanda is a form of chemotherapy used in the treatment of certain types of blood cell cancers. This eMedTV segment gives an in-depth look at the specific cancers Treanda is used to treat and how the drug works. A list of off-label uses is also included.
  • Treanda Warnings and Precautions
    Infections and life-threatening reactions are some of the possible complications with Treanda. This eMedTV Web selection discusses other important warnings for using Treanda safely, including precautions for women who are pregnant or nursing.
  • Treatment of Polycythemia Vera With Gleevec
    Although it is an off-label use, polycythemia vera can be treated with Gleevec. This eMedTV Web page lists other off-label uses for this drug, as well as conditions it is approved to treat, and explains when it is usually prescribed.
  • Treatments for Leukemia
    Several different treatments for leukemia are available, which this eMedTV segment lists. This page covers aspects of treatment to discuss with your healthcare provider and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Trenda
    A doctor may recommend Treanda to treat lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia in adults. This eMedTV segment examines this chemotherapy drug, including how it is given and potential side effects. Trenda is a common misspelling of Treanda.
  • Types of Leukemia
    As this eMedTV page explains, the four most common types of leukemia include chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia. This article describes these types of the condition in detail.
  • Vencristine
    As this eMedTV page explains, certain types of cancer may be treated with vincristine. This page describes what this chemotherapy drug is used for, lists potential side effects, and covers dosing tips. Vencristine is a common misspelling of vincristine.
  • Vincristene
    As this eMedTV article explains, people who have a type of acute leukemia may benefit from treatment with vincristine. This resource describes dosing instructions and potential side effects. Vincristene is a common misspelling of vincristine.
  • Vincristin
    A doctor may prescribe vincristine to treat acute leukemia in adults, children, and infants. This eMedTV page describes this prescription drug in more detail and discusses some dosing information. Vincristin is a common misspelling of vincristine.
  • Vincristine
    Vincristine is a drug prescribed to help slow down the progression of certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection presents a comprehensive overview of this chemotherapy drug, including dosing tips, specific uses, safety issues, and more.
  • Vincristine Dosage
    Vincristine comes as an injection that is given intravenously (by IV) into a vein once a week. This eMedTV resource covers vincristine dosing guidelines, with details on how your amount is determined and tips on what to expect during treatment.
  • Vincristine Drug Information
    By affecting how cancer cells grow, vincristine can help treat certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV page contains information on vincristine, including how this chemotherapy drug works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Vincristine Neuropathy
    This part of the eMedTV Web library explains how some people who are receiving vincristine may develop certain nerve problems called neuropathy. This article discusses this topic in more detail and offers a link to additional information.
  • Vincristine Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, it is common for people who are using vincristine to develop side effects like constipation, nausea, and mouth sores. This page lists other potential problems this drug may cause, including some that require medical care.
  • Vincristine Sulfate
    Doctors may recommend vincristine sulfate as a type of chemotherapy for a certain type of leukemia. This eMedTV Web page contains details on specific uses for this drug and describes why vincristine may not be safe for some people.
  • Vincristine Sulfate Injection
    Available as an injection, vincristine sulfate is given once a week to treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV resource explains how this chemotherapy drug is given and how your specific dose is calculated. A link to more details is also provided.
  • What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?
    Researchers are continually learning more about acute myeloid leukemia and what causes it. This eMedTV article explains how certain factors, such as past chemotherapy treatment and a history of blood disorders, may increase your risk.
  • What Does Tasigna Do?
    Tasigna is prescribed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia in adults. This page from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at what Tasigna does and how it works. A link to more detailed information on possible uses for this drug is also provided.
  • What Does Vincristine Treat?
    Healthcare providers may recommend vincristine as a type of chemotherapy for certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web selection addresses the question of what vincristine is used to treat. It also offers a link to more details on uses for this drug.
  • What Is Busulfan Used For?
    A doctor may prescribe busulfan to slow down the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia. This eMedTV segment further discusses what busulfan is used for and explains whether there are any reasons this drug may be used for unapproved purposes.
  • What Is Mitoxantrone Used For?
    Adults with certain types of multiple sclerosis or cancer may benefit from mitoxantrone. This eMedTV page explains how using mitoxantrone can cause certain cells associated with these diseases to die. More details on receiving this drug are also included.
  • What Is Rituxan?
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, Rituxan is approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and other conditions. This article takes a closer look at what Rituxan is, how it works, and possible side effects.
  • What Is Vincristine Used For?
    Adults, children, and infants who have certain types of leukemia may use vincristine. This part of the eMedTV Web site examines how this chemotherapy medication works and describes some unapproved reasons a healthcare provider may prescribe this drug.
  • Xytoxan
    Cytoxan is a medication used to treat certain kidney problems in children and various types of cancer. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this medication and offers a link to more information. Xytoxan is a common misspelling of Cytoxan.
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